2:00 pm to 3 pm -     Clearing Sacred Space Using Herbs - Vickie Penninger

 

    Vickie will speak on using sage, lavender, and other herbs in energy clearing of homes and gardens.  She will also briefly cover the use of elixirs and flower essences.



Vickie Penninger

Vickie is a healing facilitator offering Quantum Clearing, Reiki, Arcing Radial Light and Crystal Energy Therapy. She is a Healing Touch practitioner, has completed Medical Intuitive Training and is a certified practitioner of ThetaHealing.

Vickie utilizes many modalities in her work including flower essences, aromatherapy, chakra balancing and repair, cord cuttings, past life regression, spirit release work, & energetic clearing of property.  Vickie performs Illuminations, Extractions, death rites and soul retrieval in the tradition of Inkan shamanism.

Vickie offers classes in Reiki, Arcing Radial Light, Munay-Ki Rites, Past Life Regression and Crystal Energy Therapy.  www.thereikichannel.com



                                                 Make Your Own  Herbal Eye Pillow


   Below  are instructions on how to create an eye pillow and it's a fun project.  My two cents, discounted to it's actual worth, maybe 1 cent, is I would not put the herbs themselves into the pillow but would place them in an oversize tea bag. Rather than sew shut the end of the pillow I would use velcro so the pillow can be opened, replenished and reused.
 
   The reason for a tea bag is now the actual cloth does not stain as easy, you can remove the herbs and change the tea bag with other herbs enhancing the life of the eye pillow as well as changing the fragrance.  There are several herbs used for relaxation besides the below and you can change the ratios as some folks enjoy more of Herb A and less of Herb B so you end up with a customized gift. 
 
   If you give away the Eye Pillow then you can give a new "Tea Bag" of herbs throughout the year for your friend to replenish their personalized gift. 
 
   Anyway hope you enjoy making.  Have fun. 
 
Herbanite Bob
 
Make Your Own Eye Pillow

by Rosalee de la Foret

Lavender eye pillows are simple to make, yet luxurious to receive. I have been making lavender eye pillows for my friends and family for years and they are always appreciated.

It's been reported back to me that lavender eye pillows have helped people sleep better and reduce tension headaches.

I like using lavender eye pillows to take a restful break during the day, and I also like to place them in my pillow case at night so I can be relaxed by the soothing fragrance even if the pillow isn't over my eyes.

To make lavender eye pillows you'll need:

  • Fabric cut to 8.5" X 8.5" (I like silks and satins, but soft cotton, flannel, and knit also works great.)

  • Matching thread

  • 3⁄4 cup of flax seed

  • 1⁄4 cup of dried herbs (My favorite blend is one part lavender to 1⁄2 part chamomile and 1⁄2 part wormwood. There are more herb suggestions at the end of the article.)

  • Sewing machine (optional) Lavender eye pillows can easily be sewn by hand as well. The added time in making them assuredly means a more valued gift.

To begin cut your fabric to a desired length and width. I like anywhere from 8 - 9 inches.

If you are working with a fabric that frays easily sew a zig zag stitch around the entire fabric.

Next, fold the fabric in half with the "wrong side" of the fabric facing out. Sew along three sides of the fabric, leaving the top open.

Now, fold the eye pillow inside out so that the right side, or pretty fabric is facing out. Fill this with ¾ cup flax seed. The flax seed adds weight to the pillow helping to relieve tension around the eyes.  You may need to work with the amount of flax seeds if you are using different fabric measurements.


 Next, you can add about a 1⁄4 cup of dried herbs.

There are so many fragrant herbs to place in your eye pillow.

  • Straight lavender smells beautifully and is a very relaxing herb. 

  • Chamomile is also known for it's relaxing qualities.

  • Wormwood is used for vivid dreams.

  • Sage and Eucalyptus can be used for clearing sinuses.

  • Rose petals are certainly delightful.

  • You can also use essential oils for fragrance, however I find that when I use good quality herbs my pillows stay fragrant for years without essential oils.

  • My favorite blend is mostly lavender with a pinch of chamomile and wormwood. The smell is complex and soothing.


 Once your eye pillow is filled, fold the un-sewn edges in and sew along the edge to close the eye pillow

Et voila, a beautiful eye pillow that your friends and family will love to receive this holiday season.


Herbal Gifts is a an excellent eBook by Rosalee de la Foret, author of the article above.

In this eBook, Rosalee covers...

  • Herbal Honey using many types of herbs, including rose hips!

  • Syrups

  • Cordials

  • Sorbets

  • Herbal tea blends

  • Bee pollen candy

  • Herbal chai blend recipe

  • Flavored butters

  • Seaweed cookies

  • Bath balls

  • Bath salts

  • Facial Masks

  • Sachets & Pillows

  • LOTS more...


Lamb's EarHere at HerbFest one of the best stories for the children coming to visit with Farmer Bob is the story of Lamb's Ear.  Of course we adults know it as Lamb's Ear...
 

  We allow the kids to touch the plant's leaves which immediately leaves them with the impression of what an actual lamb's ear feels like.  You should see those beautiful eyes of the kindergarteners through 4th grade kids come alive as they imagine a small lamb and stroking it's ear.  Next is the easy question when you ask how many of you have had a "boo-boo"?  As you might imagine it's generally 100% especially with the kindergarten.

      "Raining Cats and Dogs"


   Have you ever wondered how the phrases," caught red handed" or to visit and "get the cold shoulder" were derived from?

   The HerbFest E-Newsletter sign up will give you the answers with a short weekly snippet explaining the origin and in many cases the reason for the expression. The HerbFest Herbal Lore and Legend series is to say mildly, fascinating. Yes it did "rain cats and dogs" while one sat in the kitchen eating "humble pie" anticipating the "June bride" wedding after the "annual bath".  With religious taboos being what they were no one would want to marry a smelly bride or groom so there is a practical reason we have marriages when we do and it's a carryover from a religious practice.



   Did you know there really was a "Bouncing Betty" who helped  future neighbors cross America? In one of our snippets you will discover why she became known as such and the herb that celebrates her help to future generations.

   If herbal lore and legend is not your cup of tea then we intersperse the tips with how to cook with herbs, crafting potpourri, creating perfumes, growing herbs and also how to harvest and preserve herbs. In short order there has to be an area of interest touched upon in our Herbal Lore and Legend series and best of all it's FREE.

   We enjoy sharing these delightful stories with you each week and look forward to your participation. Sign up now for the free series and enjoy the ride!!!
  This expression has it's origin in medieval England when the Knights were sent by the King to collect the annual rent for the use of the King's land. 

    Most of the King's Knights were good honorable men and when they came into the town to collect they were welcomed and made to feel comfortable and given nice accommodations.  They were good and were treated as such getting the best food seasoned with herbs and spices.

    Now the bad Knights were known as the ones that not only collected what was rightly due the King but also extracted additional money, goods, or spices for themselves.  They were not respected and once they entered the town they were given the basement to sleep in which was usually smelly, damp and uncomfortable.  The peasants did not want these unwelcomes staying around.

    When it came time to feed the bad knights they were not given the best food but the worst part of the animal carcass was used which was usually the "cold shoulder".  This was a sure sign of being unwelcome in the community. 

Now you know the story of how we use the term, "cold shoulder".